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Bone Grafting

Bone grafting is used for restorative dentistry procedures including bridges and dental implants. This treatment is performed when the jawbone has receded or cannot support the implants required. Bone grafting will create a strong foundation for implants. Jawbone volume may be affected by periodontal disease, tooth extractions, injuries, or infections. Bone grafting can help address tooth gaps, tooth disease or deformities. Bone grafting benefits include jaw stabilization and preservation.

Bone Grafting Process

The patient will meet with the dentist for a comprehensive consultation. During the appointment, the dentist will perform an oral exam to evaluate the condition of the teeth and gums. The dentist may also perform panoramic X-rays to view any disease below the teeth or gums. If the patient has periodontal disease, tooth deformities, or gaps, then the dentist may recommend a bone grafting procedure. Through these results, the dentist may further examine the area by going under the gum to view how much bone is required. There are various types of bone grafts offered. The dentist will determine the best bone graft for the patient’s condition.

Types of bone grafts

  • Autogenous Bone Graft
  • Allograft Bone Graft
  • Xenograft

The bone grafting procedure may take several months to complete. The bone will be harvested from the patient’s body before the procedure to add to the area of concern. The bone graft will increase bone mass and support the implants.

During the bone grafting procedure, the dentist will numb the area using a local anesthetic. A small incision will be made to place the new bone. The dentist will fuse the bone with the existing bone to promote cell growth and adhere the bone to the area. The dentist will then educate the patient on the aftercare instructions. The dentist will prescribe medication to help any swelling, discomfort, or infection.